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Lane Southern Orchards Fall Festival coming this weekend


Pumpkins, at a peach orchard. Yes, seasonal tradition meets Georgia tradition this weekend with the 7th annual Fall Festival at Lane Southern Orchards.

Rubber Duck racing, corn maze adventures, and hay rides are a few activities you'll find at the festival, but that's not all.

Duke Lane Junior is the President of the Lane packing company and says he's excited for the festival.

"For the adults and the children we have music actually we have music that's back in my time from the '60s, so I'm looking forward to it."

He also says there's one part of the festival that warms his heart, "To be able to take part of our proceeds and take them up there to the Children's Hospital in Macon, and then we spend that whole half a day up there with the children, carving pumpkins and painting pumpkins."

FVSU aims to prevent alcohol abuse and STDs


Fort Valley State's Behavioral Services Center launched the Teaching Everyone about Risks Community Coalition or Tears2C.

The program aims to lower alcohol and substance abuse...and drop the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases.

"We've developed relationships with community providers such as Phoenix Center Behavioral Health services,"explained Jacqueline Caskey-James, the director of student health, "We've developed a relationship with the local DUI school here, HODAC in Warner Robins."

All efforts to bring individuals outside the school to the program.

The program targets 18 to 24-year-olds in Houston and Peach counties and involves peer-driven sessions that teach STD prevention and the impact of drinking.

Proposed Government Regulations Are Challenging to Members' Electric Bills

REYNOLDS/PERRY/WARNER ROBINS/COLUMBUS-Proposed government regulations are expected to be extremely challenging for Flint Energies member bills, according to Chief Executive Officer Bob Ray.

“Since 2008, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has generated at least nine new regulations which attempt to reduce coal-fired generation for power plants,” said Ray. “Just two of those regulations have already cost Flint members $105 million.”

“These regulations essentially prevent construction of future coal generation plants,” he said. “The new ‘Clean Power Plan’ which has been proposed gives Georgia no credit for already reducing emissions since 2005, sets targets for renewable energy and efficiency which will cost more than they save, calls for more natural gas generation but no more gas pipelines to get the gas into Georgia….and effectively destroys affordable energy for our members.”

Disease expert at FVSU: 'be rational' on Ebola


Dr. Earl Long, a former health scientist for the Centers of Disease Control, gave a lecture on Ebola at Fort Valley State Wednesday.

Long based the lecture on his experiences with the disease on his last trip to west Africa last year.

He's an expert on parasitic diseases.and was in west Africa to improve health services to reduce malaria when the Ebola outbreak erupted.

He says Ebola came to the forefront of his research, after one of the students who accompanied him on his trip died from the disease.

"Before it happened, Ebola was something that was there. I was not particularly concerned. I knew what disease was and I knew how to avoid it," Long said.

Governor Deal tours Blue Bird plant


Governor Nathan Deal visited Fort Valley on Thursday to tour the Blue Bird bus factory.

They are not only creating buses, Deal says, they are doing important work in creating jobs.

Now that Georgia has the highest unemployment rate in the country, the governor says job creation is crucial.

Eco-friendly, profitable alternatives to corn


Fort Valley State researchers were looking for an alternative to corn.

And thanks to 2.5 million dollars in federal grant money, they may have just found it.

"We were making bio diesel out of [corn] and the prices were sky rocketing, so definitely we needed a crop that can supplement corn," said researcher Dr. Hari Singh.

The alternatives are tropical plants like Napier grass, giant reed plants, and Forage Sorghum.

These plants can feed livestock and make bio fuel, two common uses of corn.

"Most of the farms you have some prime land and then some part of the farm is left without any use," said Dr. Bharat Singh, a lead researcher.

He says these grasses can be grown on that leftover land.

Which means farmers can make a profit making bio fuel, without touching their primary crops.

Blue Bird sold to Texas company


Peach County's largest employer will soon have new owners.

A Texas company, Hennessey Capital Acquisition, says it has reached a deal to buy the Blue Bird Corporation in Fort Valley.

Hennessey says they'll purchase all of Blue Bird's outstanding stock from the investment company that now owns it. Counting cash stock purchasing and taking over Blue Bird's debt, Hennessey says the deal is worth nearly $500 million.

President and CEO Phil Horlock will remain in charge at Blue Bird, according to the news release.

Horlock, tells us the founder, Albert Luce got the inspiration for it many years ago from his young daughter, as she waited for a school bus one day.